Bill Murray In “Ghostbusters 3?” Will Believe When I See It

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Although it’s a phenomenon that’s rarer than sightings of Haley’s comet, there are a few sequels that are superior to the original movies: Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Hellboy II: The Golden Army, Star Trek 2: The Wrath of Khan.

It’s really not surprising that Ghostbusters II: We Only Did It For The Money, isn’t included on this very short list. This dud of a sci-fi comedy was a textbook example of a bad sequel; it was boring, derivative, predictable, and unnecessary. Ghostbusters II was a bad idea and a lousy movie, and it never should have been made.

Unfortunately, bad ideas are as commonplace as breast implants in Hollywood, so naturally the studio guys are talking about doing Ghostbusters 3, God help us. On October 14, 2010 Stefano Paganini, Sony’s Product Marketing Manager, proudly announced that a script was finally approved and claimed that the original cast promised to return.

Does that mean Bill Murray will return? In a recent interview, Ernie Hudson (the token African-American character in an amazingly melanin-free New York City) claims the only reason the sequel to the sequel hasn’t happened yet is Bill Murray.

“Dan and Harold are working on the script. If it happens we will see but Bill has been the hold up. His definition of good is a little bit different than everybody else’s.”

Oddly enough, I think Mr. Hudson’s observation about Murray is absolutely correct, and that’s why there’s still a chance that if Ghostbusters 3 gets green-lighted, Murray won’t be in it. Sure, Mr. Bill was at the Spike TV Scream Awards accepting an award for Zombieland dressed in his “Ghostbusters” costume, but I believe he was just playing a cruel practical joke at his co-stars’ expense. Murray hasn’t publicly committed to anything, other than expressing his loathing for the idea.

If you think about it, Bill Murray’s definition of “good” is the reason why he won a Golden Globe award for Lost In Translation, after all.

Remember, Ghostbusters II was over twenty years ago. In the meantime, Murray has evolved into a talented and well-respected character actor who has worked with non-mainstream visionary directors such as Wes Anderson, Jim Jarmusch and Sofia Coppola. The man who portrayed Dr. Peter Venkman doesn’t exist anymore, and expecting him to do that again is as ridiculous as expecting Woody Allen to do a sequel to Bananas.

Hopefully, Bill Murray will keep his artistic integrity and forget about the money. That would be a phenomenon as rare as a good sequel.